Make Rhubarb Happen this Summer

After patiently waiting out winter, I think it’s safe to say summer is here! A sure sign of summer, aside from 90-degree days, is the bright, glossy stalks of rhubarb that have started showing up in my garden, as well as the local farmers’ market and in the produce section at the grocery store. Rhubarb is a sweet and savory, diverse vegetable that can be incorporated into beverages, breakfasts, sides and desserts.

I highly recommend rhubarb: If you haven’t tried it, you must! Here are four rhubarb-full recipes to start.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Smoothie

Ingredients
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped rhubarb
  • 1/2 cup frozen banana, sliced
  • 1/2 orange, juiced
  • 1 cup milk (almond, cow, soy or coconut)
  • 1–2 tablespoons protein powder, optional (whey, pea, hemp)

Instructions

  • Blend all of the ingredients until smooth.

Strawberry Rhubarb Overnight Oats

Ingredients

Oatmeal:

  • ½ cup oats
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • ½ tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ scoop vanilla protein powder (optional)

Topping:

  • ¼ cup fresh rhubarb, chopped
  • 6 medium strawberries, diced
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 teaspoon honey
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the oatmeal ingredients in a jar or container with a lid, stirring well. Refrigerate overnight.
  2. The next morning, put chopped rhubarb, strawberries and water in a small skillet and heat over medium heat.
  3. Cook 3–5 minutes, or until fruit is softened and cooked down.
  4. Add honey, and then remove from heat.
  5. Top the oatmeal with the fruit and serve immediately.

From Sinful Nutrition

Pork Chops with Ginger Rhubarb Compote

Ingredients

Pork chops:

  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 4boneless pork chops that are about 6 ounces each
  • 4small fresh rosemary sprigs for garnish (optional)
  • olive oil for grilling or cooking the chops

Compote:

  • 2teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2small red onion, diced
  • 1clove minced garlic
  • 4large stalks rhubarb, cut into 1/4-inch crosswise slices
  • 1 large orange, juiced
  • 1teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon honey
  • salt
Instructions
  1. Pull the pork chops out of the fridge 30 minutes before cooking and season both sides with salt and pepper.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the 2 teaspoons olive oil over medium-high and sauté the onion until tender and translucent. Add the garlic and sauté another minute or so.
  3. Turn the heat to low, add the rhubarb, orange juice and ginger, and then stir. Cook, stirring occasionally until the rhubarb gets tender without completely losing its shape. Add the honey and a generous pinch of salt. Stir until the compote is ready (taste and adjust seasoning if needed) and then take off the heat.
  4. Prepare your grill so it’s at a medium-high heat. Brush the grill with oil and lay on the chops. Cook to your desired doneness, about 3–4 minutes per side for “medium.” (You can also cook the chops in a heavy skillet or under a broiler.)
  5. Remove from heat and rest for 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish with fresh rosemary sprigs and serve with rhubarb compote on the side.

From Mom’s Kitchen Handbook

Healthy Strawberry Rhubarb Bread

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup organic cane sugar
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 1/4 cups strawberries, chopped
  • 3/4 cup rhubarb, chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350o
  2. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, salt and nutmeg together.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk the almond milk, eggs, sugar and coconut oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix lightly until combined​.
  4. Mix the strawberries and rhubarb into the batter. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 40-50 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean.
  6. Cool for 10-15 minutes, then remove from the pan and allow to cool completely.

From Fannetastic Food

Alternatives to frying

Many of us grew up with fried foods, and we all know they bring a sense of comfort, can be a quick and easy way to fix the main dish of your meal and are so very yummy! However, fried foods are not the most beneficial for your health. We know now that not all fats are created equal: healthier fats (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, natural saturated) are better for you and even desirable compared to unhealthy fats (trans fat). Frying food can eliminate everything that’s healthy about a food, so here are some terrific alternative cooking methods to frying.  

Sautéing/Stir-frying

This method of cooking can be quick and easy and give foods an enriched flavor. Plus, a lot more nutrients are saved through sautéing or stir frying. Sautéing involves cooking food, typically vegetables and proteins in a pan over high heat with oil (extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, butter), liquid (broth or water added 1-2 tablespoons at a time to cook and brown food without steaming) or homemade sauce. Stir-frying is similar, except the food is cooked at higher heat and faster speed. It needs to be constantly stirred and tossed so it doesn’t burn.

Roasting/Baking

I recommend this form of cooking when you’re trying a new protein or vegetable. Roasting or baking caramelizes food with a dry heat, creating a sweet and savory flavor out of the natural sugars of the food. Season the food, add oil if you want, put on an aluminum foil-lined baking sheet and put in the oven.

What’s the difference between roasting and baking? Meats or vegetables that are a solid structure are roasted. Foods that don’t start as a solid structure (muffins, cakes, casseroles) are baked.

Braising/Stewing

Braising and stewing are best done with heartier vegetables and lean proteins, as the foods become soft and tender and full of flavor. You can braise in water, broth or any flavorful liquid. Put everything in a pot and cook over low heat for several hours. For the most flavor, I recommend sautéing the vegetables before adding them to the liquid. You can also use this cooking method in a slow cooker.

Grilling

I used to be afraid of grilling, as it’s easy to cook the outside and not the inside, especially with lean proteins. But, with practice, I’ve gotten much better at it. Grilling can provide a rich, deep, smoky flavor to all your foods, and vegetables caramelize as well while getting crispy. Marinate, season and place on the grill to cook. With vegetables, so they don’t fall through the slits, wrap in oiled aluminum foil.

Steaming

When I recommend steaming, many people think of bland and stringy food. However, when done right, food, especially vegetables, can become tender and flavorful while keeping most of their nutrients. Delicate foods, such as most vegetables and fish, are good candidates for steaming, but there are other possibilities. I recommend steaming over the stove or in the microwave.

Whichever method you choose to prepare your foods—if it’s not frying, it’ll be beneficial to not only your health, but also your waistline!

A Pasta Salad You Can Feel Good About!

As warm weather (finally!) descends upon us, you might find yourself attending more picnics, potlucks or other outdoor events you have to bring food to. Often, the problem with potlucks is that dishes that most people would enjoy at a party tend to not be the healthiest. But with minor substitutions, this pasta salad is sure to be crowd-pleaser while still being a healthy option.

Italian Pasta Salad
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Ingredients
  1. 12 ounces whole wheat pasta
  2. celery
  3. cucumber
  4. tri-colored bell peppers
  5. 16 ounces Olive Garden light Italian dressing
  6. 1 packet Good Seasons Italian dressing seasoning mix
Instructions
  1. Boil pasta until al dente (firm to bite), then drain, rinse and cool.
  2. Chop desired amount of veggies and put in a large bowl.
  3. Add the Italian dressing and seasoning packet and mix well.
  4. After the pasta has cooled, add it to the veggies and mix well.
  5. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  6. Serve the next day, or make ahead a few days in advance.
Something to Chew http://somethingtochew.com/
 

Considering Diet to Help Prevent Cancer

March is colorectal cancer awareness month, and many health care organizations are promoting scheduling regular screening for colorectal cancer, such as getting a colonoscopy.

Colorectal cancer screening targets everyone over the age of 50. Your doctor might even recommend getting screened earlier if you are at higher risk or have a family history of colorectal cancer. While you should still count on regular screenings as your best bet to prevent colorectal cancer, there are some things you can do diet-wise to help prevent colorectal cancer.

Prevent Colorectal Cancer: Diet Do’s

The best things to eat—and this applies to really everyone, not just someone trying to prevent cancer—are high-fiber whole grains, green leafy vegetables and cruciferous vegetables. The following are lists of types of these foods, so you can get an idea.

High-fiber whole grains

  • Whole wheat bread
  • Oatmeal
  • Brown rice
  • Barley

Green leafy vegetables

  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Romaine lettuce

Cruciferous vegetables

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels sprouts

Green leafy vegetables are important because they contain carotenoids. Carotenoids help prevent cancer by acting as antioxidants. Folate, also contained in these veggies, may offer protection against colorectal cancer, breast cancer and lung cancer.

Prevent Colorectal Cancer: Diet Don’ts

You might see a little repeat of information here from other blog posts, but only because these “diet don’ts” are pretty applicable for anyone wanting to live a healthier lifestyle. Limiting foods rich in animal fats, red meat and alcohol help prevent colorectal cancer.

Diets high in red meat have been associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. To eat less meat, think of fruits, vegetables and whole grains as the entrée at meals, with meat as the side dish. And you can drink a little, but it would be better to not drink at all. Alcohol has also been associated with an increased risk for colon cancer.

Looking for more information on colorectal cancer?

The Springfield Clinic web page for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month has a lot of information about colorectal cancer and colonoscopies, including an article written by one of our Colon & Rectal Surgery doctors, James Thiele, MD, FACS, FASCRS, about the importance of getting screened regularly for colorectal cancer and how the colonoscopy procedure works. Check out this information and schedule your colonoscopy today!

Baby, It’s Cold Outside—Tips for Eating Right during the Winter Months

During the cold and dreary winter months, food can almost feel a bit lacking as we crave the summer’s bountiful abundance of fresh fruits and vegetables. But lucky for all of us, there are plenty of lesser-appreciated foods, such as root vegetables, beans, frozen fruits and vegetables—even the canned variety.

I totally get it, as the temperature outside (and in my office) continues to drop, it’s tempting to curl up with your favorite comfort food. But keeping our bodies well nourished is crucial to not only prevent weight gain but also to keep our immune systems fighting against all those pesky germs.

Meal Plan

The key to remember is: “If it’s not there, you can’t eat it.” So you’ve got to make sure these better-for-you foods that I mentioned earlier are readily available, whether that be in the house, at work or—believe it or not—in the car. How do we make this happen? Well, for starters, grocery shopping.

Maybe you’re like me and are not a fan of grocery shopping. In the winter, especially, it can be a dangerous expedition with all those bags and grocery cart! Plus, the coats, coats, coats, coats—(I’ve got 3 kids, so I feel like coats take up the whole grocery cart!)

To try and make this expedition or triathlon as painless and accident free as possible, I strive to plan our meals for the entire week. I include leftovers with this meal planning too. I list all the ingredients needed and see if I have what we need already in the cabinets or fridge. Yes, its tedious and one I do after the kids go to bed, but saves trips to the grocery store. Plus, I try to find recipes with similar ingredients for the week. For example, if you have carrots for soup, think about other ways you can have the carrots, such as roasted for a side, shredded in a salad or cooked in the slow cooker with a roast.

Meal planning is important because it saves you time and money. How many times have you made a trip in the in the snow, only to get home and realize you forgot an ingredient (or more!) meaning you have to either go back to the store, figure out something completely different—or giving up and running through the drive-thru for dinner. Planning ahead will save you the hassle!

Maybe this could be the time to try out the drive up or delivery services offered by many local grocery stores. You could also try some of the meal delivery services, but I encourage to be cautious when selecting one (and this is a whole blog most in itself).

Stock the Pantry

While it may be more expensive in the short-term, the more you have pre-stocked in your pantry/cabinets, the more things you have to get creative with later. I like to have canned beans, different kinds of rice (brown, jasmine, basmati, wild), quinoa, oatmeal and dry roasted/unsalted nuts.

Look at Sale Items

Keep an open mind to clearance grocery items. You may be surprised to find that a random item could spark an idea for a meal or snack. Out-of-season fruits and vegetables can be expensive, so watch for sales, but don’t be afraid to substitute in-season fruits or vegetables in your recipe.

Don’t Forget about Snacks

I encourage you to stock up on snacks and stash them in lots of places, especially in the car. Some examples are: trail mix, protein bars (that have at least 20 grams protein), whole wheat crackers, squeezable unsweet applesauce, unsalted/dry roasted nuts, roasted chickpeas, hardboiled eggs, string cheese, snack size bags of popcorn, hand fruits and vegetables (grapes, apples, blueberries, baby carrots) just to name a few.

So while you curl up next to the fire this winter, be thinking about how you can plan ahead, try something new and have food available—and don’t forget to eat every few hours.

 

Why is World Diabetes Day Important?

November 14th was World Diabetes Day. To acknowledge this, it is important to understand why there is a day dedicated to diabetes awareness. The burden of diabetes has quadrupled over the past decades; the World Health Organization estimates there are 422 million adults who currently have diabetes worldwide. That is 1 in 11 adults. Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report found that in 2017, there were 30.3 million people who had diabetes, of which 23.1 million people are diagnosed and 7.2 million people remain undiagnosed.

The burden of diabetes is not just in the numbers affected but also in health costs, and, most importantly, quality of life. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputations. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030. Currently, it is estimated that 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes and another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2015 and 2012, respectively.

The above numbers are why we must focus on awareness, prevention and treatment of diabetes.

What are the symptoms of diabetes?

Diabetes can be treated. Dietary and lifestyles factors have been proven to make the largest impact on decreasing, preventing and treating the complications from diabetes. As with most progressive illnesses, diabetes onset typically goes unrecognized by the patient for a number of years, with the exception of type 1 diabetes, which is typically a sudden onset of symptoms. So what are the warning signs of high blood sugars and possibly undiagnosed diabetes?

Symptoms of hyperglycemia to look for:

  • Frequent urination
  • Frequent thirst and hunger, even right after eating
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Changes in vision
  • Sores that won’t heal
  • Gum disease, gums pulling away from teeth, red, swollen gums or changes in the way your dentures fit
  • Weight loss
  • Tingling, pain or numbness in hands or feet

How does a diabetes diagnosis happen?

When should someone consider getting screened for diabetes?

  • Are overweight (BMI >25)
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (Some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk.)

What tests will my providers/doctors order, and what will they mean?

Result A1c
Normal less than 5.7%
Prediabetes 5.7% to 6.4%
Diabetes 6.5% or higher

 

Result Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG)
Normal less than 100 mg/dl
Prediabetes 100 mg/dl to 125 mg/dl
Diabetes 126 mg/dl or higher

 

Result Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)
Normal  less than 140 mg/dl
Prediabetes  140 mg/dl to 199 mg/dl
Diabetes  200 mg/dl or higher

 

Your doctor will typically use two methods to confirm a diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes.

What comes after a diabetes diagnosis?

In either case of prediabetes or diabetes, the treatment includes a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco. It is important to incorporate these with any medication regimen your doctor may prescribe. In fact, diet and lifestyle changes have been shown to decrease your hemoglobin A1c by one to two percent!

When you are thinking of beginning a new dietary plan, you must incorporate schedule, food behaviors, and even your favorite foods. For example, if you grew up on meat and potatoes, I would not say you could never eat those foods again. Instead, it is important to discuss healthier cuts of meat or poultry or healthier types, portions and ways to prepare potatoes. Many people think a diet is depriving yourself of food—instead think of adding new foods to portion-controlled foods you enjoy. A good guideline is the USDA’s Plate Method.

Using this method, you can incorporate a controlled amount of carbohydrate sources, while increasing your non-starchy vegetable intake. The most challenging part for most individuals is making half of your plate non-starchy vegetables. It helps to get creative with your vegetables—explore zucchini noodles, spaghetti squash pasta or even eggplant pizzas! Or, try this cauliflower rice recipe:

Cauliflower “Rice” Salad
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Ingredients
  1. Salad
  2. 12 ounces of cauliflower florets or pre-made cauliflower “rice”
  3. 1 cup cucumber, diced
  4. 1 cup grape tomatoes, cut in half
  5. 2 green onions, sliced
  6. 3 tablespoons sliced Kalamata olives
  7. Dressing
  8. 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  9. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  10. 1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Instructions
  1. Make your own cauliflower rice by placing cauliflower florets in a food processor and processing them to rice-like consistency. (Be careful not to over-process.)
  2. In a salad bowl, combine all salad ingredients.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the dressing ingredients.
  4. Pour dressing over salad and serve with reduced-fat feta cheese, if desired.
Notes
  1. Try cauliflower rice in other traditional rice dishes—you might be surprised!
  2. From http://www.diabetes.org/mfa-recipes/recipes/2016-07-cauliflower-rice-salad.html.
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