Stay Healthy Inside and Out this Winter with these Tips

During these winter months, we often want to sit down in our stretchy clothes by the fire with something warm and comforting. And in small chunks, this is perfectly acceptable. However, vegging out too much can increase our chances of gaining weight, catching “something” that’s out there, or just feeling plain ol’ miserable.

So, to help keep up your health and sanity during the winter season, here are some of my go-to tips.

  1. Eat within one to one and a half hours after waking.

I hear a lot, “I’m not hungry in the morning” or “Breakfast food is so carb-y.”  But who says you have to eat breakfast food for breakfast?

Eating something is always better than nothing when it comes to breakfast. Try something from this list for a high-protein, low-carb breakfast:

  • an egg (hardboiled, scrambled, over easy, even in the microwave!)
  • plain Greek yogurt with honey or frozen fruit stirred in
  • cottage cheese
  • almond/peanut/cashew butter (NO Nutella®!)

I’m not against using protein supplements either, but be cautious when choosing. In addition to protein for breakfast, balance your breakfast by adding a nutrient-dense carbohydrate, such as sweet potatoes or steel-cut oats. I’ve been known to eat a sweet potato and walnuts for breakfast; it’s a sweet and protein-full breakfast. The biggest takeaway here is: It doesn’t have to be a “typical” breakfast, as long as you’re eating something nutrient rich and within an hour and a half of waking up.

  1. Fuel your body as often as every two to five hours.

Fueling your body throughout the day will keep your metabolism going and help with portion control. My problematic time is often in the afternoon. If I don’t have something to eat then, I either get “hangry” or I overeat at dinner. A couple of quick and easy snacks include: 

  • 2 tablespoons hummus + ½ cup sugar snap peas
  • 5 reduced-fat Triscuits® + 1 ounce low-fat cheese
  1. Don’t skip meals.

Even on a day when you have a larger eating episode planned, don’t skip a meal. If you go longer than three to four hours without eating—believe it or not—your metabolism starts to slow down. Your body starts working against you instead of for you. The key to remember is that “something” is better than nothing. It doesn’t have to be a full traditional meal to count as a meal. Something as simple as cottage cheese, canned peaches (canned in light syrup) and cucumber slices with ranch dressing can actually be a meal.

  1. Plan ahead.

This is the biggest challenge to most of us. I hear often, “if I just planned, it would all be better.” I like to say, “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail,” but you can have the best laid plans and have it all fall through.

But some plan is better than no plan. Start small and work up. Try laying out or prepping for breakfast, lunch or dinner for the next day. Then plan for three days a week, then a week and then work up from there. For this time of year, start with just planning for a challenging day and that will get you going in the right direction.

  1. Eat as a family

Did you know the average family meals lasts about 18 minutes? I’ve heard from many of parents that they spend over an hour in the kitchen—and for what? But, believe it or not, these 18 minutes together carry a long list of benefits.

When I say eat as a family, I’m don’t mean plopping down on the couch in front of the TV. Sitting around the table is the most beneficial. In my house, we even sit around our island some nights when I haven’t had time to clear all the paperwork off the kitchen table. But, keep the TV, phones, gaming systems, etc. off during this time.

  1. Leave food in sight.

This doesn’t mean to not put your cold food in the refrigerator, but keep it where you can see it. Store produce and other healthier foods in see-through containers at eye level in your fridge or in a pretty bowl visible on the counter. We typically eat more of what we can see, and if it looks good, it can be one less barrier to making healthy choices happen.

I also like to create a healthy snack bag with nonperishable items and leave it in my car. You may think this is crazy, but you never know what could happen on the road, especially this time of year. It never fails—my shopping takes too long or the roads are not good, and my drive home takes twice as long. Luckily, in my snack bag I have a 100 calorie pack of almonds and walnuts, protein bar, apple, cuties, and a bottle of water. It doesn’t have to be anything elaborate, but it saves calories and money from stopping somewhere and getting something to eat/drink or gorging when you get home.

  1. Ask yourself 3 questions

I encourage you to ask yourself these three questions when are you are going to the refrigerator, cabinet or food table.

  1. Am I hungry or am I actually thirsty?
  2. Am I hungry or bored?
  3. Am I hungry or just tired of dark days and winter?

If you answered “hungry” to any or all of these questions, then get something to eat. But this system will get you thinking before you start mindlessly eating.

I know this time of year can be difficult, on all accounts, in terms of eating. But maybe one or more of these tips will help you to maintain your weight, health and sanity. Happy Holidays!

5 Shortcuts to Mealtime

You’ve done your meal planning but the day has still fallen apart, now what are you going to do for dinner? 

You’ve done your meal planning but the day has still fallen apart, now what are you going to do for dinner?

 

Here are 5 Shortcuts to get a meal on the table in no time…

  1. Have fruits and vegetables already prepped and ready to go. Have these fruits/vegetables washed, cut and in individual containers. Put a dry paper towel on top before you put the lid on to help soak up the moisture. Do this on a day that works best for you. For some it may be the weekend and for others it may be a weekday/weeknight.
  1. I have priced cauliflower this time of year and buying the already cut up cauliflower is about break even with a head of cauliflower. My family loves cauliflower and there is so much you can do with it: Fresh, steamed, roasted and mashed. When you have it already cut up you can do any of the above in a short amount of time.  Don’t be afraid to look around in your fresh produce section to find easy time savers to keep on hand.
  1. Keep staples on hand:
  • Buy meats in bulk and freeze in family portion sizes
  • White/sweet potato
  • String cheese
  • Applesauce
  • Frozen vegetables
  • Freeze bread
  • Yogurt
  • Tortillas
  • Cottage cheese
  • Peanut butter
  • Canned fruits & vegetables
  • Low Sodium canned soup
  • Italian dressing (liquid or dry)
  • Canned Beans
  • Whole Wheat Pasta (any kind)
  • 5-10 minute rice
  • Oats
  • Chicken broth (98% fat free)
  • Cream of … (98% fat free)
  • Canned fish/chicken
  • Frozen chicken
  • Eggs
  • Vegetable/Tomato Juice
  1. Keep frozen steamer bags of vegetables in the freezer. I love that they don’t go bad, you can take it out of the freezer and within 5-7 minutes in the microwave you have steamed vegetables. Honestly, this can be quicker than going through the drive through.
  1. Ziploc Zip’n Steam Bags: these are fabulous. You can cook vegetables and protein in them.  You can actually make a whole meal in minutes in them.  I always keep baby carrots on hand, so in a pinch I throw some of the baby carrots in the bag, look at the cooking directions and usually in a few minutes you have a side.  But you can also cook fish/chicken in these fresh or frozen.  FABULOUS!!  Get them in the baggie aisle.

Simple Meals

These are quick and simple meals, with no special ingredients and would primarily be using staple ingredients that you already have on hand. I recommend keeping 5-10 recipes in your ‘back pocket’ for when you need a meal on the table in just a short amount of time.

  1. Thawed chicken with either Italian dressing or BBQ sauce on top and bake
  2. Soups – chicken noodle soup, you can make any canned soup better with your own ingredients added to it
  3. Breakfast for dinner: whole wheat pancakes/waffles, omelets with vegetables,
  4. Salad with all the toppings
  5. Roasted chicken from the store
  6. Quesadilla/tacos/spaghetti
  7. Cubed chicken/canned chicken with cream of chicken soup and frozen veggies, mix together. Top with stove top and bake ~30 min.
  8. 7 can soup (add 7 cans of whatever you want to make a soup), simmer on stove till warm.
  9. I’m a realist mom here – chicken nuggets, fish sticks – ITS WHAT YOU PAIR IT WITH
  10. Always remember the #plategoals to make your meals balanced. Even in a pinch, you can make it happen!

plategoals

 

Megan Klemm

 

7 Ways to Reduce Food Waste

This past summer, the American Chemistry Council stated that the American household wastes $640 on average per year in food without even knowing it. Just think of what we could do with an extra $640! Tons and tons (literally) of food get thrown away each year and this is often due to purchasing too much at the store or cooking meals that are too large. This also happens when dining out; we try to watch our portions when going out to eat, and sometime we forget our to-go baggy. Restaurants throw away guests’ leftovers and it adds to the pile of wasted food.

The average American household wastes about $640 of food each year. Save time, money, and food with these 7 tips!

Here are 7 tips for reducing food waste:

  1. Meal Planning. Plan ahead for upcoming meals. It’s helpful to choose recipes that have overlapping ingredients. This helps to reduce the amount of food purchased. Avoid buying or making too much food by preparing only 1 or 2 recipes each week. If a recipe calls for a rare or expensive ingredient, swap it out for something you have on hand or an ingredient you will use regularly.For information and tips on meal planning check out this previous blog post!
  2. Rotate Produce. Use the “first in, first out” policy. After going to the store, rotate “old” foods to the front of the fridge or pantry so these foods will be eaten first. The “new” foods that were just purchased go to the back of the fridge or pantry, unless of course these ingredients are needed immediately.
  3. Stretch the life of your fruits and veggies. Fruit that is past its prime can be used in breads or smoothies instead of being thrown away. Vegetables can be used to make stock and stale bread or crackers can be used in casseroles or to make croutons.
  4. Send home leftovers. If inviting guests over for a meal, send them home with leftovers. They get a nice meal the next day and this helps reduce food waste!
  5. Freeze it! Most leftovers will be just fine reheated. This includes meat, vegetables, fruit, and casseroles. Make sure to put leftovers in tightly sealed containers or wrap tightly in plastic wrap to prolong freezer life.
  6. Donate. Food banks are always grateful for donations. Canned items within “use-by” or “sell-by” dates are perfect contributions, but many food banks will also take produce or packaged items that have not been opened or tampered with.
  7. Compost! Food scraps can be composted and used to enhance your garden. If this is not something you want to do yourself, ask a neighbor or co-worker if they do this or know where scraps can be taken locally.Check out the infographic below from Craftsy!infographic on compost

 

Alana Scopel

Why use a meal planning website?

There is a plethora of meal planning websites out there! I did some research, tested a few sites, but Gatheredtable was by far my favorite!

Earlier this week I gave you my meal planning tips for beginners; today I’m going to share a resource I found very helpful. There is a plethora of meal planning websites out there! I did some research, tested a few sites, and Gatheredtable was by far my favorite.

Why use a meal planning website?

  1. Time saver. I don’t have time (or I don’t want to make the time) to pull out all my cookbooks and scour Pinterest to pick my recipes for the week, go through each one, and create my shopping list.
  2. Change up your diet. Sometimes I would get stuck in a rut and cook the same 8 meals over and over, but trying a suggested recipe once a week or so can help you change up your chef game!
  3. Connectivity. Your family can share the same account, so try having each member go in and pick a meal they would enjoy. 
  4. Convenience. Since you share the account with the family, anyone can go grocery shopping— just pull up the list on your phone and go!

 

↓↓↓Watch this video….then we will talk more.

Now that you are a little familiar with Gatheredtable, I’ll share my thoughts.

I love that they have a free, 10 day trial and you DON’T have to give them a credit card number to start your free trial like some other websites. I took time to play around and get familiar with Gatheredtable and the settings. I also love the Gatheredtable Web Clipper function. I have a good chunk of recipes on a Pinterest board that I’ve always wanted to try, and the Web Clipper pulls all of the details and even adds ingredients to my grocery list.

Week 1:

I started off small, only planning 3 dinners. I have roller derby practice on Wednesday and Thursday nights, and Friday nights the hubby and I are busy—so Monday, Tuesday, and Saturday it was! Everything we had was amazing. Three recipes were ones I pulled from my Pinterest board, and three were offered by Gatheredtable. We had some leftover steak that we cut up and used in omelets on Sunday morning!  

Week 1

Week 2:

I got a little ambitious this week, but once again skipped Wednesday and Thursday. Last Thursday at the farmers’ market, I picked up some green beans and sweet potatoes. I was able to find recipes that included my fresh veggies from Gatheredtable’s recipe library. With tomorrow’s leftover pulled pork, I’ll save it to use with my Sunday pita chip recipe for Pulled Pork Nachos!

Week 2

All in all, I really enjoy Gatheredtable. When you start your free trial you are assigned a personal coach who contacts you via email. Mine is super nice and answered any questions I had. My biggest issue would have to be you can only begin planning your meals 2 days before the new week starts, but my coach said they will be changing that soon. Also, when you are looking through recipes, you can only add them to the current week, but my coach said, “we’re working on making a more robust date picker soon.” For now you just have to go to the week and select the “add recipe” button to search through recipes (see image above on Wednesday the 2nd). So the two “issues” I have are already being addressed.

So the big question…how much does it cost? For this company, an annual plan breaks down to a little over $7 a month. If I can spend that or more on my Netflix and Hulu accounts, I should be able to justify spending it for meal planning!

costLike I said, there are so many resources out there! Take some time and research your options. If you have a favorite site, please share it here in the comments so all our readers benefit from your great suggestions!

Angela Holland

 

The Beginners Guide to Meal Planning

http://thepioneerwoman.com/food-and-friends_cat/how-to/

With all the back to school buzz, I hear people saying, “We’ve got to get back on a schedule,” or “We’ve got to bet back into our routine.” Between work obligations, school hours, and extracurricular activities, putting a healthy, well-balanced meal on the table can fall by the wayside—and understandably so. I’m here to encourage you that this does not have to be the case!

Two words: meal planning. Now don’t freak out, I’m not saying you have to go all Pioneer Woman! There are so many resources out there to help make meal planning effective and simple.

Here are some tips to get you started:

  1. Don’t bite off more than you can chew! When starting something new, you don’t want to overwhelm yourself. You won’t stick with it if it stresses you out .Try start with planning/prepping for 2-4 dinners the first week.
  2. Start off in your comfort zone. Are you a chicken or pork wizard? Good, start there! Pick recipes you know you can execute well. The last thing you want is to prep and cook an obscure recipe that no one in your family enjoys.
  3. But don’t forget the freshness! Pick sides that include fresh vegetables and herbs. For me, the point of meal planning is to make better use of my time at the store and in the kitchen, and to eat well. When the bulk of your grocery list lives in the produce section, that is a good feeling.
  4. Pick a resource. There are so many great resources out there for meal planning. Take some time to Google your options. Be sure to check back here on Thursday and I’ll share my experience with one of my favorites—it even generates a grocery list that is divided into categories for easy shopping!
  5. Pick a day to shop and prep. Sunday works best for me. I go to the store with my pre-generated list and shop away. I come home, round up the hubby and we prep—organizing and chopping up ingredients. You can store your preps in Ziploc bags or Tupperware, label it for the appropriate day, and your done! Include the whole family—all hands on deck!
  6. Stay up on those dishes! Maybe I’m the only one, but most the time I throw dishes in the sink, the sink gets full, and then we do dishes. More cooking at home means more dishes. Nothing is more discouraging than having to do dishes before you can even start cooking! 

Be sure to check back Thursday when I go over one of
my favorite meal planning websites!

Angela Holland

 

Sign Up Now: Doctor Is In

Doctor Is InWhen it comes to healthy eating, there is simply no “one size fits all” approach to meal planning. Helping people find their perfect diet (from the Greek word diaita meaning “a way of life, a regimen”) is one of the reasons why I love my job so much. As a dietitian, I understand that not everyone likes to consume milk or animal proteins or even gluten. It is my job to help find the most nutritionally well-rounded meal plan for patient’s to follow while still being considerate of dietary preferences, cultural habits, finances and most importantly, the patient’s goals.
Please join me this Wednesday, Sept 3rd for a free presentation on “Understanding Diets: How to find the best one for you”. I will explore many popular styles of eating from the Weight Watchers meal plan to Paleo . Topics that will be addressed will include what a sample day of each diet looks like, advantages and disadvantages of the different meal plans as well as recommendations on which eating style may work best for you.

 View the Presentation

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0IKtl0221M?list=UU6zopcfz4Krs1YNqbDKBF-g&w=560&h=315]