Recap #2: Try a “Non-resolution”

It’s been quite a while since I’ve written about how my 2018 non-resolution is going. As they say, “life happened,” which prevented me from writing but didn’t stop me from following through with my goals!

So here’s what has happened since my last recap in February. As you remember, I gave you four steps to follow:

  1. Come up with the defining word or phrase for your year.
  2. Translate your word or phrase into action.
  3. Evaluate your goal each month.
  4. Start at a time that’s right for you.

My word for 2018 is PEACE. Some of the areas I am focusing on to have more peace are

  • Meal planning
  • Reducing stress
  • Rest
  • Exercise

Meal Planning

I kicked off the new year with meal planning. I set a SMART goal to plan more meals per week. I’m still chugging along with that and am using that “Knock Knock What to Eat” pad I found on Amazon.

Rest

In February, I set a second SMART goal about rest. I set a 10:30 p.m. bedtime for myself and, believe it or not, I’m still following it!

Exercise

I set a third SMART goal for myself in March, wanting to exercise more consistently. Oh, that dreaded, dreaded word! With the weather turning nicer, I thought the time was right to start reducing stress and finding peace through consistent exercise. I set a small SMART goal, operating under the policy of “something is better than nothing.” And I encourage this with all of my patients—since daily physical activity is so important, swim, bike, walk, run or go to gym. Whatever gets you moving!

My goal was to exercise four days a week, specifically on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. On Mondays and Fridays, I work out in the morning after I drop my oldest off for school. This type of exercise is YouTube video, workout DVD, a walk with girlfriends or a class at our local rec center, and I allow for 30 minutes. On Tuesdays, I do a YouTube video, workout DVD or a walk with the kids, and on Thursday evenings I do a class at our local rec center.

And a note on YouTube videos: There are so many free workout videos on YouTube that are completely free! One of my favorite low-impact workouts is with Leslie Sansone, but you’ll be able to find just anything, so find something that works for you!

A second note on rec centers: If you don’t want to commit to a full membership, you can often pay a small free per class. Check out a facility that’s near you to see your options.

Reducing Stress

In April, I set a specific SMART goal for reducing stress. To accomplish this, I started exploring essential oils, and found they’re beneficial, not only for me, but for my family as well. I diffuse when I’m at work, and I diffuse at home in our common areas and bedrooms. It’s important with essential oils not to overdo it, but I find that my plan is working for me.

My Time

I set my final SMART goal in May, and I focused on increasing my “me time,” specifically, reading time. I set a goal to read for 10 minutes at least three times a week, preferably Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. I decided that reading before bed would be the best option, and that required me to be in bed before by 10:30 actual bedtime. I actually set an alarm on my phone to help remind me to go to bed at the correct time so I could get my reading time in!

So now you’re all caught up—these are my action plans for the first part of my year to help bring PEACE into my life. I promise I will update you at least twice more before the end of the year to bring you up to speed on how my SMART goals are going.

How are your “non-resolutions” going? (Or maybe your resolutions?) Comment below!

Does my child need glasses? An Optometrist’s Tips

The month of August is National Children’s Eye Health month, and Springfield Clinic’s Eye Institute recommends evaluating your children’s eyes right before going back to school. What are some ways to tell if your child needs glasses, though? Optometrist Braden Anderson, OD, Springfield Clinic’s Eye Institute, shares the following tips.

Watch how they watch television

Sitting too close to the TV is a good indicator that your child may be experiencing vision problems. In some cases, having a short attention span for their age may also be caused by the inability to see well.

Read into how they read

If your child holds books too close to their face, often loses their place while reading, has difficulty remembering what they read or avoids the activity altogether, they might need an eye health evaluation to see if glasses could help them enjoy this activity better.

Notice any abnormal behavior

Children who have problems seeing will often also have frequent headaches, squint, blink or rub their eyes a lot.

Ask them how they feel

If your child complains a lot about seeing double or has problems with bright light, they might be having trouble with their eyes and could use an evaluation.

Keep an eye on them during activities

Some children with vision problems may demonstrate difficulty with eye-hand-body coordination when playing ball or riding a bike. They might also avoid detailed activities, such as coloring or puzzles.

If your child is exhibiting any of these behaviors, make an appointment to see an eye specialist at Springfield Clinic’s Optical Centre. Whether you need glasses and contacts, routine eye exams with an optometrist or a referral to one of our ophthalmologists, you can do it all in one convenient location at Springfield Clinic!

The Great Food Debate

When it comes to food, making the best choices for your body can sometimes be a frustrating process, especially if you have seen how quickly food can flip from the good list to the naughty list. Here are some of the most commonly asked questions I get when it comes to the great food debate.

White Rice or Brown Rice?

Answer: White Rice

I know this blows everyone out of the water, but I’m thinking about digestion. White rice is easier on the tummy, so if you have any problems with irritable bowels or inflammation, white rice should always be your choice.

Yes, white rice has a higher glycemic index, but most of the time when you eat rice, you should be eating it with protein and vegetables. This helps lower the glycemic load of the entire meal. It’s virtually identical to brown rice when it comes to calories, fats, carbs and protein. Brown rice may claim that it is higher in nutrients, but in all honesty, those differences are so miniscule it doesn’t really matter.

Regular Soda or Diet Soda?

Answer: Neither

This is an answer that no one wants to hear but let’s be real for a second: Soda is soda. It’s made of chemicals, food colorings and carbonation. It should never replace water as a source of hydration. Regular soda contains an absurd amount of sugar or, even worse, high fructose corn syrup. Both of these contribute to insulin resistance and elevated blood sugars. Diet sodas are loaded with artificial sweeteners. These fake sugars are now known to contribute to digestive issues, disrupt the gut lining and also cause your body to crave more sugar in the long run.

Butter or Margarine?

Answer: Butter

I’m a stickler when it comes to more natural food items. Butter is one single ingredient. It is the fat that is rendered off of milk or cream. Previously, we thought that the saturated fat found in butter was the cause of poor health and heart disease. Today, we know that saturated fats, when derived from natural sources, can actually be part of a very healthy diet! Margarine, on the other hand, is a concoction of chemicals and processed oils. These processed oils, such as vegetable or canola oils, are highly inflammatory in the body.

Have other food questions you need answered? Send us a message and we’d be happy to answer ‘which is better’!

Make Rhubarb Happen this Summer

After patiently waiting out winter, I think it’s safe to say summer is here! A sure sign of summer, aside from 90-degree days, is the bright, glossy stalks of rhubarb that have started showing up in my garden, as well as the local farmers’ market and in the produce section at the grocery store. Rhubarb is a sweet and savory, diverse vegetable that can be incorporated into beverages, breakfasts, sides and desserts.

I highly recommend rhubarb: If you haven’t tried it, you must! Here are four rhubarb-full recipes to start.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Smoothie

Ingredients
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped rhubarb
  • 1/2 cup frozen banana, sliced
  • 1/2 orange, juiced
  • 1 cup milk (almond, cow, soy or coconut)
  • 1–2 tablespoons protein powder, optional (whey, pea, hemp)

Instructions

  • Blend all of the ingredients until smooth.

Strawberry Rhubarb Overnight Oats

Ingredients

Oatmeal:

  • ½ cup oats
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • ½ tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ scoop vanilla protein powder (optional)

Topping:

  • ¼ cup fresh rhubarb, chopped
  • 6 medium strawberries, diced
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 teaspoon honey
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the oatmeal ingredients in a jar or container with a lid, stirring well. Refrigerate overnight.
  2. The next morning, put chopped rhubarb, strawberries and water in a small skillet and heat over medium heat.
  3. Cook 3–5 minutes, or until fruit is softened and cooked down.
  4. Add honey, and then remove from heat.
  5. Top the oatmeal with the fruit and serve immediately.

From Sinful Nutrition

Pork Chops with Ginger Rhubarb Compote

Ingredients

Pork chops:

  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 4boneless pork chops that are about 6 ounces each
  • 4small fresh rosemary sprigs for garnish (optional)
  • olive oil for grilling or cooking the chops

Compote:

  • 2teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2small red onion, diced
  • 1clove minced garlic
  • 4large stalks rhubarb, cut into 1/4-inch crosswise slices
  • 1 large orange, juiced
  • 1teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon honey
  • salt
Instructions
  1. Pull the pork chops out of the fridge 30 minutes before cooking and season both sides with salt and pepper.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the 2 teaspoons olive oil over medium-high and sauté the onion until tender and translucent. Add the garlic and sauté another minute or so.
  3. Turn the heat to low, add the rhubarb, orange juice and ginger, and then stir. Cook, stirring occasionally until the rhubarb gets tender without completely losing its shape. Add the honey and a generous pinch of salt. Stir until the compote is ready (taste and adjust seasoning if needed) and then take off the heat.
  4. Prepare your grill so it’s at a medium-high heat. Brush the grill with oil and lay on the chops. Cook to your desired doneness, about 3–4 minutes per side for “medium.” (You can also cook the chops in a heavy skillet or under a broiler.)
  5. Remove from heat and rest for 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish with fresh rosemary sprigs and serve with rhubarb compote on the side.

From Mom’s Kitchen Handbook

Healthy Strawberry Rhubarb Bread

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup organic cane sugar
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 1/4 cups strawberries, chopped
  • 3/4 cup rhubarb, chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350o
  2. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, salt and nutmeg together.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk the almond milk, eggs, sugar and coconut oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix lightly until combined​.
  4. Mix the strawberries and rhubarb into the batter. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 40-50 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean.
  6. Cool for 10-15 minutes, then remove from the pan and allow to cool completely.

From Fannetastic Food

Alternatives to frying

Many of us grew up with fried foods, and we all know they bring a sense of comfort, can be a quick and easy way to fix the main dish of your meal and are so very yummy! However, fried foods are not the most beneficial for your health. We know now that not all fats are created equal: healthier fats (monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, natural saturated) are better for you and even desirable compared to unhealthy fats (trans fat). Frying food can eliminate everything that’s healthy about a food, so here are some terrific alternative cooking methods to frying.  

Sautéing/Stir-frying

This method of cooking can be quick and easy and give foods an enriched flavor. Plus, a lot more nutrients are saved through sautéing or stir frying. Sautéing involves cooking food, typically vegetables and proteins in a pan over high heat with oil (extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, butter), liquid (broth or water added 1-2 tablespoons at a time to cook and brown food without steaming) or homemade sauce. Stir-frying is similar, except the food is cooked at higher heat and faster speed. It needs to be constantly stirred and tossed so it doesn’t burn.

Roasting/Baking

I recommend this form of cooking when you’re trying a new protein or vegetable. Roasting or baking caramelizes food with a dry heat, creating a sweet and savory flavor out of the natural sugars of the food. Season the food, add oil if you want, put on an aluminum foil-lined baking sheet and put in the oven.

What’s the difference between roasting and baking? Meats or vegetables that are a solid structure are roasted. Foods that don’t start as a solid structure (muffins, cakes, casseroles) are baked.

Braising/Stewing

Braising and stewing are best done with heartier vegetables and lean proteins, as the foods become soft and tender and full of flavor. You can braise in water, broth or any flavorful liquid. Put everything in a pot and cook over low heat for several hours. For the most flavor, I recommend sautéing the vegetables before adding them to the liquid. You can also use this cooking method in a slow cooker.

Grilling

I used to be afraid of grilling, as it’s easy to cook the outside and not the inside, especially with lean proteins. But, with practice, I’ve gotten much better at it. Grilling can provide a rich, deep, smoky flavor to all your foods, and vegetables caramelize as well while getting crispy. Marinate, season and place on the grill to cook. With vegetables, so they don’t fall through the slits, wrap in oiled aluminum foil.

Steaming

When I recommend steaming, many people think of bland and stringy food. However, when done right, food, especially vegetables, can become tender and flavorful while keeping most of their nutrients. Delicate foods, such as most vegetables and fish, are good candidates for steaming, but there are other possibilities. I recommend steaming over the stove or in the microwave.

Whichever method you choose to prepare your foods—if it’s not frying, it’ll be beneficial to not only your health, but also your waistline!

Bake or Bake not—But there is no fry!

Popular fried foods include fish, chicken strips, corn dogs, cheese and French fries. But thanks to our Illinois State Fair, we have learned that you can deep fry just about anything.

What’s the difference between fried and baked food?

The main difference between a fried menu item and one that is baked is the amount of calories and fat. When foods are deep fried, they lose their water content and absorb more fat. Depending on the food item, the caloric value can double or even triple when fried. If your goal is to lose weight or even maintain a healthy weight, fried foods are not a good choice.

We now know that fat is actually very healthy for us. Unfortunately, fried foods have the highest content of trans fat, which is a terrible source of fat for your body and arterial health.

What are some healthy fat sources?

Healthy fats like those found in salmon and avocados are excellent for reducing inflammation in your arteries and joints. However, the oils most often used for frying contain high amounts of inflammatory fatty acids. Consuming fried foods can cause inflammation in the gut and aggravate joint and muscle pain.

One last thing…

Don’t be fooled by frozen fried foods. Those frozen chicken strips and French fries that you are “baking” in the oven? They were fried prior to being frozen. Baking is simply the method preferred for reheating them.

Ready to try a non-fried fish meal? Check out my easiest salmon recipe ever for a delicious and nutritious baked dinner!