Make Rhubarb Happen this Summer

After patiently waiting out winter, I think it’s safe to say summer is here! A sure sign of summer, aside from 90-degree days, is the bright, glossy stalks of rhubarb that have started showing up in my garden, as well as the local farmers’ market and in the produce section at the grocery store. Rhubarb is a sweet and savory, diverse vegetable that can be incorporated into beverages, breakfasts, sides and desserts.

I highly recommend rhubarb: If you haven’t tried it, you must! Here are four rhubarb-full recipes to start.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie Smoothie

Ingredients
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped rhubarb
  • 1/2 cup frozen banana, sliced
  • 1/2 orange, juiced
  • 1 cup milk (almond, cow, soy or coconut)
  • 1–2 tablespoons protein powder, optional (whey, pea, hemp)

Instructions

  • Blend all of the ingredients until smooth.

Strawberry Rhubarb Overnight Oats

Ingredients

Oatmeal:

  • ½ cup oats
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup unsweetened almond milk
  • ½ tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ½ scoop vanilla protein powder (optional)

Topping:

  • ¼ cup fresh rhubarb, chopped
  • 6 medium strawberries, diced
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 teaspoon honey
Instructions
  1. Combine all of the oatmeal ingredients in a jar or container with a lid, stirring well. Refrigerate overnight.
  2. The next morning, put chopped rhubarb, strawberries and water in a small skillet and heat over medium heat.
  3. Cook 3–5 minutes, or until fruit is softened and cooked down.
  4. Add honey, and then remove from heat.
  5. Top the oatmeal with the fruit and serve immediately.

From Sinful Nutrition

Pork Chops with Ginger Rhubarb Compote

Ingredients

Pork chops:

  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 4boneless pork chops that are about 6 ounces each
  • 4small fresh rosemary sprigs for garnish (optional)
  • olive oil for grilling or cooking the chops

Compote:

  • 2teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2small red onion, diced
  • 1clove minced garlic
  • 4large stalks rhubarb, cut into 1/4-inch crosswise slices
  • 1 large orange, juiced
  • 1teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon honey
  • salt
Instructions
  1. Pull the pork chops out of the fridge 30 minutes before cooking and season both sides with salt and pepper.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the 2 teaspoons olive oil over medium-high and sauté the onion until tender and translucent. Add the garlic and sauté another minute or so.
  3. Turn the heat to low, add the rhubarb, orange juice and ginger, and then stir. Cook, stirring occasionally until the rhubarb gets tender without completely losing its shape. Add the honey and a generous pinch of salt. Stir until the compote is ready (taste and adjust seasoning if needed) and then take off the heat.
  4. Prepare your grill so it’s at a medium-high heat. Brush the grill with oil and lay on the chops. Cook to your desired doneness, about 3–4 minutes per side for “medium.” (You can also cook the chops in a heavy skillet or under a broiler.)
  5. Remove from heat and rest for 5 minutes.
  6. Garnish with fresh rosemary sprigs and serve with rhubarb compote on the side.

From Mom’s Kitchen Handbook

Healthy Strawberry Rhubarb Bread

Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened vanilla almond milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup organic cane sugar
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 1/4 cups strawberries, chopped
  • 3/4 cup rhubarb, chopped
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350o
  2. In a large bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, salt and nutmeg together.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk the almond milk, eggs, sugar and coconut oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry and mix lightly until combined​.
  4. Mix the strawberries and rhubarb into the batter. Pour batter into a greased loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 40-50 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center of the bread comes out clean.
  6. Cool for 10-15 minutes, then remove from the pan and allow to cool completely.

From Fannetastic Food

Bake or Bake not—But there is no fry!

Popular fried foods include fish, chicken strips, corn dogs, cheese and French fries. But thanks to our Illinois State Fair, we have learned that you can deep fry just about anything.

What’s the difference between fried and baked food?

The main difference between a fried menu item and one that is baked is the amount of calories and fat. When foods are deep fried, they lose their water content and absorb more fat. Depending on the food item, the caloric value can double or even triple when fried. If your goal is to lose weight or even maintain a healthy weight, fried foods are not a good choice.

We now know that fat is actually very healthy for us. Unfortunately, fried foods have the highest content of trans fat, which is a terrible source of fat for your body and arterial health.

What are some healthy fat sources?

Healthy fats like those found in salmon and avocados are excellent for reducing inflammation in your arteries and joints. However, the oils most often used for frying contain high amounts of inflammatory fatty acids. Consuming fried foods can cause inflammation in the gut and aggravate joint and muscle pain.

One last thing…

Don’t be fooled by frozen fried foods. Those frozen chicken strips and French fries that you are “baking” in the oven? They were fried prior to being frozen. Baking is simply the method preferred for reheating them.

Ready to try a non-fried fish meal? Check out my easiest salmon recipe ever for a delicious and nutritious baked dinner!

School’s Out! Now What?

School is almost out for the summer, and, honestly, I’m not really looking forward to that. Yes, I will love having all three of my kids home, but I keep thinking about two things:

  1. I’m going to be refereeing a whole lot more!

and

  1. My grocery bill is going to skyrocket in two weeks.

What is it about kids being home all day that makes them so hungry? Sure, I’m the dietitian, and I should be providing the answers, not asking the questions. I think we can all agree that it’s tough being asked for something to eat all day, so here are a few things I plan to work on this summer to help my own children eat right while they’re home.

Schedule/Routine

As with adults, when we are bored we tend to want to eat more—kids are no exception. So still trying to have routine or schedule during the summer can help alleviate the feeling of always being “hungry.” (Note: I do believe there’s nothing wrong with kids being bored and having to figure out things to do for themselves. However, a daily routine will still help keep them from boredom snacking.)

Snack Drawer

Having a snack drawer in the fridge and in the cabinets will allow the kids to go help themselves. However, you’ll have to make sure the snacks are ready to go, so here are tips for having the food prepared and portioned out.

For the fridge:

  • Cut up strawberries, watermelon, cucumber, celery, peppers
  • Blueberries, grapes, baby carrots, pea pods, grape/cherry tomatoes
  • Fruit cups of peaches, pears, applesauce, mandarin oranges
  • Hard boiled eggs, string cheese, sliced cheese, Greek yogurt, hummus, single-serving containers of natural peanut/almond butter

For the cabinet/drawer:

  • 100 calorie packs of nuts
  • Single-portion baggies of cheese its, pretzels, goldfish crackers, animal crackers, vanilla wafers, trail mix
  • Single-serving containers of peanut butter
  • Suckable applesauce, applesauce cups, fruit cups

Food Activities:

Having the kids “play” with their food takes time for the kids and also can get them exposed to new foods. 

  • Try having kid’s string fruit and cheese onto a stick or necklace. No more candy necklaces required.
  • Make watermelon popsicles, with slices of watermelon and popsicle sticks.
  • Create playful scenes with vegetables. Check out com for more information—such a cute idea!
  • Have your child help an adult make fruit ice cream, popsicles and smoothies.
  • Make a meal on a stick, such as pizza kabobs with pita, mozzarella cheese, pepperoni, vegetables and pizza sauce.

Physical Activity:

Help your children incorporate physical activity into their daily routine. Keeping kids active will help keep their minds off food and prevent weight gain over the summer. My personal goal is for the kids to have a set number of minutes of activity before they can have screen time. Now, realistically, I know this is not going to work every day, but it’s certainly something to work toward and on. As my motto goes, progress not perfection.

Hydration:

Hydration is often overlooked on a day at home and more thought about when out and about. However, this is one of the most important things for both kids and ourselves during the summer. Plain water is most certainly the best option, but with all these great fruits and vegetables coming in, experiment with fruit infusing waters.

The Benefits of Spring Cleaning on Your Mental Health

For many, spring means warmer, brighter weather—and that means it’s time to throw open the windows and start spring cleaning!

We’ve discussed before how spring cleaning has health benefits. Opening the windows to let in fresh air can actually improve the humidity and change the oxygen balance in your home. Even sunlight coming in through the windows can help clean the air. But spring cleaning also has associated mental health benefits, including improved mood, decreased stress and heightened creativity. Here are some specific mental health benefits of spring cleaning:

Gets you moving

Spring cleaning is a physical activity, and it gives you a sense of accomplishment. Cleaning gets the happy chemicals moving around in your brain, propelled by an increased heart and respiratory rate. Spring cleaning can give you some of the same mental health benefits as physical exercise, such as running or biking. What’s more, a disorganized space is associated with less physical activity, while organization and order have been associated with choosing to eat more healthy and taking charge of your general health

Reduces stress

Clutter and stress are related, and we know stress is bad for mental health. For example, piles of paper can create a false image that work is endless, and that even when we finish what we are working on, there is more to be done. Looking at the clutter in your home can bring on the anxiety of incomplete tasks or just make it more difficult to accomplish your daily routine. Many Americans feel that home organization and cleanliness are among their biggest stressors. Women specifically have shown to have chronic levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, if they perceive their homes as cluttered. Attacking that clutter can help reduce that stress.

Invites a fresh start

Sometimes mental health issues seem overwhelming because of their long history. You can fall into a pattern of poor mental health and get stuck there. Spring cleaning makes you feel like you are getting a fresh start. When your house looks different—decluttered and clean—you feel a greater ability to change the state of your mental health as well.

Tips for “spring cleaning” your mental health:

If you’re struggling with your mental health, why not try giving it a fresh start as well? Spring cleaning is not only a deep house cleaning, but an exercise of the mind!

  • Create a targeted, personal to-do list of what you want to achieve emotionally.
  • Divide goals into dream goals as well as short and long-term goals.
  • Get at least 20 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • Get up at the same time each day to create a better sleep routine.
  • Schedule regular social activity.
  • Nourish your body and mind with a healthy diet.

First Day of Spring brings…Spring Cleaning!

Is clutter in your space preventing you from living a healthy lifestyle? Believe it or not, disorganization can do more than just make it hard to find daily things. Spring cleaning can actually help you live more healthfully.

Set a goal to declutter

This spring, set a health goal for yourself to start decluttering little parts of your life one at a time. You can use my “non-resolution” method from previous posts if you don’t have a favorite goal-setting method.

Remember to be specific with your decluttering goal, just like any health goal you have set. Here are some examples:

1) Organize your container cabinet.
You want to set a goal to take your lunch to work twice a week (or once a week or every day—tailor your goal to your life) but your Tupperware® or plastic container cabinet is a mess. Decluttering this space will make it more feasible to pack and take a lunch to work. Once this cabinet is tidy, packing leftovers directly from the dinner table into containers in the fridge is easy. Lunch for the next day is ready to go!

2) Organize your pantry.
Do you ever find yourself overbuying food because you can’t remember what you have in stock? Pull everything out of your cabinets, wipe down the shelves and strategically organize your food. You may be surprised how much you have, and this may be a good time to take a box or can to your local food bank. Put items that are due to expire in the front and work them into your meal plans.

3) Organize your refrigerator.
Your refrigerator can get dirty very quickly, so it’s time to deep clean it. Go through everything: I bet half of those condiments are expired! Store produce and other healthier foods in see-through containers at eye level in your fridge or in a pretty bowl visible on the counter. We typically eat more of what we can see, and if it looks good, it can be one less barrier to making healthy choices happen.

Declutter for better health

Add decluttering to the goals you already have to be healthy in order to make them easier to obtain and maintain. After you have met your goal for a significant amount of time, make sure you reward yourself (NOT with food!) to help you keep going. Happy First Day of Spring and spring cleaning!

Stay Healthy Inside and Out this Winter with these Tips

During these winter months, we often want to sit down in our stretchy clothes by the fire with something warm and comforting. And in small chunks, this is perfectly acceptable. However, vegging out too much can increase our chances of gaining weight, catching “something” that’s out there, or just feeling plain ol’ miserable.

So, to help keep up your health and sanity during the winter season, here are some of my go-to tips.

  1. Eat within one to one and a half hours after waking.

I hear a lot, “I’m not hungry in the morning” or “Breakfast food is so carb-y.”  But who says you have to eat breakfast food for breakfast?

Eating something is always better than nothing when it comes to breakfast. Try something from this list for a high-protein, low-carb breakfast:

  • an egg (hardboiled, scrambled, over easy, even in the microwave!)
  • plain Greek yogurt with honey or frozen fruit stirred in
  • cottage cheese
  • almond/peanut/cashew butter (NO Nutella®!)

I’m not against using protein supplements either, but be cautious when choosing. In addition to protein for breakfast, balance your breakfast by adding a nutrient-dense carbohydrate, such as sweet potatoes or steel-cut oats. I’ve been known to eat a sweet potato and walnuts for breakfast; it’s a sweet and protein-full breakfast. The biggest takeaway here is: It doesn’t have to be a “typical” breakfast, as long as you’re eating something nutrient rich and within an hour and a half of waking up.

  1. Fuel your body as often as every two to five hours.

Fueling your body throughout the day will keep your metabolism going and help with portion control. My problematic time is often in the afternoon. If I don’t have something to eat then, I either get “hangry” or I overeat at dinner. A couple of quick and easy snacks include: 

  • 2 tablespoons hummus + ½ cup sugar snap peas
  • 5 reduced-fat Triscuits® + 1 ounce low-fat cheese
  1. Don’t skip meals.

Even on a day when you have a larger eating episode planned, don’t skip a meal. If you go longer than three to four hours without eating—believe it or not—your metabolism starts to slow down. Your body starts working against you instead of for you. The key to remember is that “something” is better than nothing. It doesn’t have to be a full traditional meal to count as a meal. Something as simple as cottage cheese, canned peaches (canned in light syrup) and cucumber slices with ranch dressing can actually be a meal.

  1. Plan ahead.

This is the biggest challenge to most of us. I hear often, “if I just planned, it would all be better.” I like to say, “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail,” but you can have the best laid plans and have it all fall through.

But some plan is better than no plan. Start small and work up. Try laying out or prepping for breakfast, lunch or dinner for the next day. Then plan for three days a week, then a week and then work up from there. For this time of year, start with just planning for a challenging day and that will get you going in the right direction.

  1. Eat as a family

Did you know the average family meals lasts about 18 minutes? I’ve heard from many of parents that they spend over an hour in the kitchen—and for what? But, believe it or not, these 18 minutes together carry a long list of benefits.

When I say eat as a family, I’m don’t mean plopping down on the couch in front of the TV. Sitting around the table is the most beneficial. In my house, we even sit around our island some nights when I haven’t had time to clear all the paperwork off the kitchen table. But, keep the TV, phones, gaming systems, etc. off during this time.

  1. Leave food in sight.

This doesn’t mean to not put your cold food in the refrigerator, but keep it where you can see it. Store produce and other healthier foods in see-through containers at eye level in your fridge or in a pretty bowl visible on the counter. We typically eat more of what we can see, and if it looks good, it can be one less barrier to making healthy choices happen.

I also like to create a healthy snack bag with nonperishable items and leave it in my car. You may think this is crazy, but you never know what could happen on the road, especially this time of year. It never fails—my shopping takes too long or the roads are not good, and my drive home takes twice as long. Luckily, in my snack bag I have a 100 calorie pack of almonds and walnuts, protein bar, apple, cuties, and a bottle of water. It doesn’t have to be anything elaborate, but it saves calories and money from stopping somewhere and getting something to eat/drink or gorging when you get home.

  1. Ask yourself 3 questions

I encourage you to ask yourself these three questions when are you are going to the refrigerator, cabinet or food table.

  1. Am I hungry or am I actually thirsty?
  2. Am I hungry or bored?
  3. Am I hungry or just tired of dark days and winter?

If you answered “hungry” to any or all of these questions, then get something to eat. But this system will get you thinking before you start mindlessly eating.

I know this time of year can be difficult, on all accounts, in terms of eating. But maybe one or more of these tips will help you to maintain your weight, health and sanity. Happy Holidays!